The first book signing:
Vince and his wife, Dominique, at Dark Delicacies Bookstore. (2002)



July 2014:   WLDS/WEA1 am
May 2014:    The Funky Werepig
May 2014:  Reader's Lane

February 2010: The Funky Werepig
February 2010:  BloodyDisgusting.com

2010 (Video): Count Gore's Judy Comeau

March 2009: The Funky Werepig

December 2008: Snark Infested Waters

Interview with: Graveside Tales
INTERVIEW WITH GRAVESIDE TALES

Hi, Vince. Could you start us off with a little info about yourself? We here on the forums are so used to seeing text and avatars that it can be easy to forget there are human beings behind the words. What's a day-in-the-life-of-Vince Churchill like?

CHURCHILL:
Hey guys. Well, I'm a 46 year old horror geek that's been writing stories for most of my life. I'm a fan of horror, sci-fi, martial arts, action films, and old Marvel comics, which I incorporate elements of into my writing all the time.

Well, an average day for me is heading off to my day job at my old high school, Jacksonville High School. I used to supervise the all day internal suspension, but this school year I do a little of everything, kinda filling in the cracks? (smile). Right after school I head to football practice, where I help coach the freshman team. The evenings are spent having dinner and conversation with my beautiful wife, and depending on the night, either watching some football, or a favorite show like Lost, Burn Notice, Sons of Anarchy, or Life. Occasionally, I get a little writing done too. Usually Monday through Wednesday nights I'm working on my weekly newspaper column, which appears Sundays in the Jacksonville Journal Courier newspaper. Otherwise, I'm working on my current novel, "Good Night My Sweet," or a novella I'm revising for publication next year.

GRAVESIDE TALES:
As a writer, what do you find is the most challenging part about crafting fiction, and how do you overcome it?

CHURCHILL:
For me, the biggest challenge is prioritizing projects. I have so many ideas I want to bring to life, but as a novelist the time investment is such that you can't really afford to make a mistake about which idea to work on for months. As I was finishing up the first draft of my current novel, I was already starting the mental sweepstakes for the next one. It took me most of the summer to decide which idea to pursue, but I've settled that and I'm totally jazzed to get into it. I've learned that it's better for me to let the ideas simmer, then battle it out in the back of my mind until the winner steps forth, than to force the issue, or choose what I think might be the most marketable, or what might be "hot" a couple years down the road, etc. And odds are, if I live long enough, the runner up idea will eventually find itself getting written? (smile).

GRAVESIDE TALES:
What initiated your interest in the horror genre?

CHURCHILL:
Well, my mom got me started on those old black and white thrillers, then the horror flicks of the seventies such as Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Last House on the Left, Jaws, The Exorcist, Dawn of the Dead, and Halloween took hold and never let go. Then Stephen King just dotted the i and crossed the t.

GRAVESIDE TALES:
Any personal experiences where you might've felt like a character in a horror novel?

CHURCHILL:
Totally, but the stories are better told campfire style? ha ha ha. I will say that one was a classic Halloween graveyard experience, and the other occurred with a group of friends in an old camper. Some of my buddies will never let me forget my classic line, "No spider threw that rock!"

GRAVESIDE TALES:
Is there a specific aspect of the genre that is particularly appealing to you?

CHURCHILL:
I love the unlimited range and lack of boundaries of horror. Originality is difficult, but it's not hard to twist the every day into something very unsettling. I like forcing readers to see what I want them to see, feel what I want them to feel. I particularly love blending genres, especially horror and action, like in the films Dog Soldiers, Brotherhood of the Wolf, or Grindhouse's Planet Terror. Writing horror or dark fiction is like being the creepy guy who operates the scary ride at the traveling carnival. I really dig that position of controlling the ride, which is the great challenge of entertaining readers.

GRAVESIDE TALES:
Writer's block strikes sooner or later; are there any home remedies or writing exercises you use to stave off the dreaded curse?

CHURCHILL:
Honestly, I've never had writer's block, (knocking on wood) and I hope I never do. For me, it all lies in the passion for what you're writing. If you're not stoked as a writer to create, how can you expect readers to get excited about the finished product? My relationship with my writing is about the same as Cartman's relationship with cheesy poofs. I just crave it all the time. I'm a writing junkie.

GRAVESIDE TALES:
When the submission call went out for Beast Within, what was the first idea that came to mind? What made you choose the were-creatures in your story?

CHURCHILL:
Well, I got a little lucky. I had a story already written for an anthology that lost its publisher just waiting for a home, and it just happened to be a werewolf story. I grew up a huge comic book fan, and I'd had an idea for a werewolf version of Blade Forever. I just thought it would be cool to have a Batman-like superhero that used his curse to combat other supernatural creatures, but especially other werewolves. "By the Light of the Silvery Moon" was born, and a possible novel and screenplay are on my writing "to-do" list.

GRAVESIDE TALES:
Where can we see more of your work?

CHURCHILL:
Well, if you live on L.A. or San Fran, my books are on the shelves of Dark Delicacies in Burbank or Borderland's in San Francisco. Readers can check out my novels and some of the recent anthologies I appear in on Amazon.com. I have two novels: The Dead Shall Inherit The Earth, which is an outer space horror tale involving a group of mercenaries doing a job for the government that goes backed up toilet bad. There's plenty of nightmarish action, and zombies make an appearance during the final quarter of the book. The Blackest Heart is my futuristic nod to High Plains Drifter, The Crow, and Spawn. It's also set in outer space but has a distinct western feel, and I think the collection of villains the resurrected hero is up against is the book's major plus. It's a lot of fun. Both books were written for adults, so expect heavy doses of imaginative violence and sexuality. Also, despite the pulp nature, both books have very strong female characters. That's what happens when you grow up digging Emma Peel of the Avengers, Vasquez from Aliens, and being a fan of Adrienne Barbeau. Hopefully in 2009 my latest novel "Good Night My Sweet," and novella Condemned will be in readers' hands, along with an appearance in an anthology or two.

GRAVESIDE TALES:
Could you give us a non-spoiler synopsis of your story "By the Light of the Silvery Moon?"

CHURCHILL:
Well, it's about a superhero werewolf called Lunar, who, as his career is at an end, is trying to track and destroy a pack of werewolves preying on Los Angeles. He has one last chance to destroy them, but a major complication turns his mission into a journey far more personal and perilous than he ever planned on.

GRAVESIDE TALES:
Thanks, Vince!

CHURCHILL:
Thank you Matt & GST for giving "By The Light of the Silvery Moon" the opportunity to be in such a great anthology; and for me having a chance to reach out to the readers.
X
Interview with: Dark Recesses Press
Interview with: The Undead
INTERVIEW WITH THE UNDEAD


THE UNDEAD:
Thank you for taking time out of your busy schedule for this interview, Vince. Tell us a little about your background and how you got started writing.

CHURCHILL:
Thank you for asking, it's my pleasure. My background is a bit scattered. I've worked a lot of different jobs...everything from being a messenger to a bank teller to a nightclub bouncer to a dating service salesperson. I don't have a writing related degree in English or Journalism, etc. For the past several years I have worked at Showtime Networks in both the film production and development departments. As for writing, I still have the report card from my 1st grade teacher who noted I was already writing little stories. I really have been writing for as long as I can remember. Always been a big reader. Started off with comic books and eventually graduated to novels like Jaws & The Exorcist until I became a disciple of Stephen King...[laughing] My Mom is responsible for my early introduction and love of horror. She used to take me to movies when I was young, particularly the drive-in, where I was treated to the glory we call the 70's and such classics as TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE, LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT, CHILDREN SHOULDN'T PLAY WITH DEAD THINGS...man, I love my Mom!

THE UNDEAD:
What drives you to write?

CHURCHILL:
Well, there are a couple of things. One, I think I've always known it's what I'm supposed to do, so I've always done it. The second is that I get off on the power I potentially hold over my readers. I want to make them see what I see in my head, make them feel things against their will. I want to entertain people in ways they'd have never thought they could be entertained, much less volunteer for! And I'm really addicted to the creative process of writing. I just love doing it.

THE UNDEAD:
What projects are you working on now (or have planned)?

CHURCHILL:
Well, besides my short story in The Undead, I've just started my 4th novel called "Good Night My Sweet," a contemporary end-of-the-world love story I'm anxious for people to read. After that I will complete the work on the sequel to my 2nd book (The Blackest Heart) which I'm calling Pandora. And I'm fighting to complete my first horror script called THE BUTCHER BRIDE before the holidays. After that, it might be time to return to another zombie novel with an idea I came up with as I was brainstorming for The Undead. The basic idea for the zombie thing would allow me to push the envelop for some really nasty, ugly fun.

THE UNDEAD:
Out of your previously published stories/novels which are you most proud of?

CHURCHILL:
I'm very, very happy with my latest novel, The Blackest Heart. I think after the first one I had to prove to myself that I could really become a novelist and write another book, you know? I think readers that missed my first novel, The Dead Shall Inherit The Earth, will find a gem in The Blackest Heart. It's my ode to THE CROW and HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER with a sci-fi twist. I also have a short story called "Happy To Meat You" that I never found a home for I really love. I may have to motivate myself someday and produce a short film out of it.

THE UNDEAD:
Who are your favorite authors and why do they inspire you?

CHURCHILL:
I have a lot of them but I'll try to narrow them down. [laughing] Jack Ketchum, Robert Deveareaux and early works of Shaun Hutson and Richard Laymon for their fearlessness and their ability to shock. Books like Deadweight, The Girl Next Door, and Off Season really showed me the power a book can have when the author exploits his or her creative freedom to the fullest. I'm still learning to do that. I really feel a kinship to early James Herbert & Robert McCammon for their ability to blend action with the horrific. I think my style is most like theirs. Clive Barker & his Books of Blood opened up the world of horror for me like no other piece of writing. I really dig Joe Lansdale because his writing crosses all genres and he writes like a master storyteller speaks. Stephen King of course, though I have probably only read 1-2 of his last several books, but the early stuff I inhaled. I also love Skip & Spector, Steve Perry for his Matador series and Richard Avery for his Expendables series, both of which are my favorite sci-fi/action series.

THE UNDEAD:
What is your favorite zombie movie and why?

CHURCHILL:
Hands down, my favorite zombie flick is DAWN OF THE DEAD. And that would be the original, not the wannabe...[laughing] I love the action, the horror, the social commentary, the relationships between the 4 main characters...I'm also a fan of CEMETERY MAN & DEAD ALIVE with that kick-ass kung-fu priest!

THE UNDEAD:
What is your favorite zombie book and why?

CHURCHILL:
Now that's a much tougher question...it's funny, I have several bookcases full of horror novels, mostly paperbacks, and on my main bookcase I have my 13 all-time favorite books on the top shelf. I have many zombie books, but the only one on the top shelf is Wet Work by Phillip Nutman. Right behind it would probably be the first Book of the Dead. And even though this is off the question a little bit, by far my favorite zombie short story of all-time is "Abed" by Elizabeth Massie in the second Book of the Dead collection. Talk about a nasty ass mind f*ck. Yikes!

THE UNDEAD:
The current trend seems to be making zombies fast and/or smart (or at least smarter). Do you support this trend or do you prefer the classic Romero-style zombies?

CHURCHILL:
I think having grown up with slower zombies, I'm a bit more old school about it. The faster zombies of 28 DAYS LATER (I know, I know, not really zombies) & the DAWN OF THE DEAD remake are a fun change of pace but I think I'll stick to the more conventional Romero-style dead.

THE UNDEAD:
Thank you again for your time and thanks for submitting your story for The Undead.

CHURCHILL:
Thank you, it's been fun. And thank you for asking me to take part in such a cool project.
X



An avid horror, thriller, and action film fan,
Vince Churchill has (7) published novels:

Midnight Eternal

Good Night, My Sweet

Hyde

The Butcher Bride

Pandora

The Blackest Heart

The Dead Shall Inherit The Earth

The Dead Shall Inherit The Earth was featured in
2009's XBOX Magazine's ZOMBIES:Collector's Edition
as one of the "37 Greatest Zombie Triumphs."

His short fiction has appeared in anthologies such as
The Undead,  The Undead Volume 2: Skin and Bones, 
The Horror Library - Volume One:
 The Beast Within, and the recent  Midnight Walk.

He is also a list contributor in the
Book of Lists: Horror.

Vince's novella, Condemned, anchors the
Butcher Shop Quartet II
horror anthology.



Home \ Fresh Kill \ Novels \ Screenplays \ Events \ About Vince

Questions? Comments? Contact Vince Here:

However, unfortunately, due its soaring high prices, this brand often gets out of budget of replica watches sale. A lot of people cannot afford to disturb their budget by buying ladies replica watches sale; and the brand remains to be an aspiration for them. But thankfully, now with the introduction of many reliable good quality rolex replica sale, this problem has been solved to some extent. Now, all those ladies who had always wanted to own a Rolex can fulfill their dream by buying replica watches uk. These replicas are exact copy of the original. Each and every detail of the rolex replica sale is keenly copied so that nobody can trace any difference between the original and the imitation.